The Honest Kitchen: Easy-peesy tea

Are you a tea lover? I sure am, although lately I’ve been getting into the coffee habit too hehe. Teas give so many benefits–lowering your cholesterol, antioxidants, keeping you up and perky…anyway, while most of the time Singaporeans take their tea–lipton, black tea leaves– with condensed milk (which I loooooovvvveeee to bits), I also enjoy a variety of teas such as chamomile, rosehip and such.

So when I saw the Easy Peesy tea from The Honest Kitchen, how could I give it a miss? 😛

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This Easy Peesy tea helps to fight urinary tract infection! (Hence easy PEEsy, geddit? heh) and UTI is a big time problem for many pet owners, especially those who feed their pets kibble. Raw and canned-food feeders have it easier, but that doesn’t rule out UTI entirely.

(I really have to say this because there are so many raw advocates out there who claim miraculous things for raw)

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Ingredients of this herbal tea: Horsetail, cleavers, couch grass, nettle and marshmallow root.

Note–herbs can interfere with medication, so use carefully if your pet is on meds!

Horsetail: 

Pros:

Horsetail is traditionally been used as a diuretic (helps rid the body of excess fluid by increasing urine output and is also supposed to help with osteoporosis, because of the silica content found in it.

Cons:

  • Contains trace amounts of nicotine
  • Prolonged use may cause drop in thiamin levels
  • Prolonged use not advised

Cleavers: 

Benefits: A whole long list! Let me adapt a paragraph for you from AltNature…

“The dried or fresh herb is anti-inflammatory,  astringent, diuretic. A valuable diuretic, it is often taken to treat skin problems such as seborrhoea, eczema and psoriasis, and as a general detoxifying agent. The plant contains organic acids, flavonoids, tannins, fatty acids… It has a mild laxative effect and stimulates the lymphatic system and has shown benefit in skin related problems.”

Wow…this seems like a miracle plant! 0.o

Cons:

Should only be taken for a short period at any time, not for prolonged use

Couch grass: 

Benefits:

  • Anti-inflammatory
  • Diuretic
  • Helps to dissolve bladder stones
  • Contains silica (for bones)
  • Has been found to be tolerated well

Couch grass is most commonly used to treat gout, rheumatism and skin diseases

Cons:

Herbologist.com puts it bluntly:

‘Traditional medicines often overestimate the power of couch grass’ HAHA! Oh dear. That’s an ouchie right there!

As with all herbs, prolonged use is not recommended.

Stinging Nettle: 

Benefits:

  • Diuretic, has been traditionally used in ayurvedic meds to treat UTI and Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia (Symptoms:reduced urinary flow, incomplete emptying of the bladder, post urination dripping, and the constant urge to urinate
  • Anti-inflammatory
  • Helps to lower blood pressure (I guess this is a con for people with low blood pressure, like me!)
  • Helps to reduce nighttime urination (hmmm!)

Cons:

  • Could interfere with medication, if taken together

Marshmallow root

Benefits:

  • Anti-inflammatory
  • Reduced UTI and stones in the urinary tract
  • Good for diarrhea and constipation.
  • Can be applied topically

Cons:

  • Can cause low sugar levels in some individuals

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Recycle your cardboard Easy- Peesy tea container!

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Loose tea leaves. Wonderfully aromatic!

Here’s the guideline for use from the Honest Kitchen website:

supplement-teas

It’s always good to have measuring spoons and cups at home anyway, so do get some! 😉

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Since the cats have never had Easy Peesy tea, I decided to make a little, just to try it out. Got a quarter of a teaspoon and some freshly-boiled water…

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A swirl of tea leaves!

You may strain it before giving it to your pet, or you could mix this into their food directly, if you like. I didn’t strain it.

It smells really great (although the cats didn’t think so)! But to the human it was lovely. So…well, I took a sip. And then I also finished what the cats didn’t use for the night. The taste was light–I’d say even lighter than chamomile, and definitely not as strong as earl grey. Smells a bit exotic, like a chinese herbal brew, but not as thick, black and gross (Mother Dearest makes them for us all the time).

Did I have to go to the toilet a lot after that (mind you it was only half a cup) ?

Well…erm…yes. Haha! If I were a cat I’d be annoyed: why do I have to pee so much? What did mummy give me?

Anyway, since there was no way the cats would lap this up on its own, I soaked their dinner in this tea and offered it to them.

Muffin went on strike that night and refused to touch any of his tea-tainted food.

Here’s another variation of their tea-soaked food…actually I put this up because I was so proud of the beautiful eggs haha! It isn’t every day that my eggs look so good!

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The cats were more accepting of this because of the egg I guess–that probably masked the taste of the tea somewhat.

And yes, they did urinate more after this tea. The thing is, if your cat/dog has UTI from holding in their pee too long– afraid to go to the toilet (because of toilet guarding by another dog/cat?), I don’t think this will help much!

If your pet is fine and you want to help prevent UTI/ or use this product as an occasional treat, I think there isn’t any harm. However, if your pet already has UTI, please take it to the vet!

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Singaporean readers can get this from Polypets (at least, that’s where I got it from), while the rest of the readers may get it direct from the company, if you can’t find this anywhere!

As for me, I went back to this:

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Just peppermint will do for me, thanks! 😉

Sources:

Cleavers, AltNature.com

Cleavers, Medicinal Herb Info

Couch Grass, Herbologist. Net

Horsetail, University of Maryland Medical Centre

Marshmallow root, WebMd

Stinging Nettle, University of Maryland Medical Centre

The Healthy Properties of Nettle Tea, Ayurvedic Tea Time

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Categories: The Raw Explorer, Uncategorized

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